“Anti-Semitic graffiti top hate crime on NYC subway this year”

The article that I found regarding antisemitism was published by Cleveland Jewish Times on April 26, 2017. The article discusses the unfortunate rise in antisemitic graffiti in New York. Specifically, the article states that antisemitism has been the most popular form of hate crime found on New York City subways so far this year. The article says that 22 of 31 hate crimes that took place on subways in the city this year specifically invoked antisemitic imagery or threatened jews. This is a big rise from last year when only seven incidents happened over the same time period. One of the incidents in which antisemitic graffiti was found went viral when a group of commuters joined together to erase the hateful message. Jared Nied, the leader of the effort, even received an award from the ADL for being a stand-up citizen. While that specific incident was somewhat uplifting, the underlying problem is still clear. The rise in antisemitic incidents is very real, and has continued both in and outside of New York City. Many of the specific incidents that have happened on the New York subways make reference to the holocaust and nazism for seemingly no reason. Graffiti likes this is seemingly an attempt to make it seem as if Jews are a burden to society or are inherently worse than others. This is a sentiment that was extremely influential during the holocaust, and is extremely bigoted. To see that these ideas still exist and continue to be influential is terrible. Hopefully people will do all they can to prevent these incidents in the future.  ...

Kansas State University

Even on Holocaust Remembrance Day, the anti-Semites at Kansas State University continue to spread hate across their campus. A poster illustrating a pyramid of people was posted on a telephone pole on campus that stated “Ending white privilege starts with ending Jewish privilege. Is the 1 percent straight white men? Or is it Jewish?” Recent weeks have showed a significant increase of incidents targeting many minority groups on Kansas State University’s campus, focusing on the LGBTQ community and African-Americans. The president of Kansas State University released a statement on April 24th, “These few, random incidents should be kept in perspective,” Myers wrote. “The K-State family is committed to diversity and inclusion and should not be influenced by these isolated incidents. We don’t know who has distributed these missives, or why. But we do know they don’t represent the values of the K-State family.” I think this was a very odd response to this situation. There was no mention of finding the instigator(s) or promising a higher level of dedication to preventing future hate on their campus. From his message it sounded like these incidents are not being taken as seriously as they should be. He seems to stress that this is not a representation of everyone and is more worried about that than actually putting a stop to Antisemitism on their campus. He mentions how these incidents are few and random, which is missing the point that they should not be happening at all. I think the reaction to hate on campus should always be taken seriously as a matter of safety for all students.   Anti-Semitic poster hung at...

Princeton University Antisemitic Fliers

The article I am writing about this week was posted by centraljersey.com on April 21st, 2017. It describes an incident that took place at Princeton University earlier this week. Princeton’s Center for Jewish Life and a few other buildings were the target of antisemitic and racist fliers. Callers reported a masked individual taping fliers to buildings late Thursday night. The exact message on the fliers is yet to be released but it says they contained the phone number and name of a white nationalist organization along with other antisemitic messages. Thursday, April 20th was also the Birthday of Adolf Hitler and that is likely a contributing factor for when the incident took place. On the same day, Vanguard America, a white nationalist group posted a message that targeted Jewish Princeton students and showed  a picture of Hitler with a birthday hat. Both of these incidents seem to be extremely antisemitic, but I am a little disappointed in this school/website for not being more clear about the content of the tweets and fliers. While I understand why they may choose not to disclose the contact information of the group who was behind these events, I think there is importance to sharing the content of what was said. I say this because although it can be disheartening (and unfortunately inspiring for antisemitic individuals), sharing what is said can help create an understanding that this is a serious problem and that antisemitism is very much alive. It can also show how Jewish students still face frequent discrimination, even at the most prestigious Universities in the country....

Antisemitic fliers on Princeton University campus

http://www.centraljersey.com/news/anti-semitic-anti-immigrant-fliers-found-on-princeton-university-campus/article_e78b438e-26bf-11e7-bff5-dba12c3f993f.html Antisemitic fliers were found on three buildings at the Princeton University campus in New Jersey, including the building used by Princeton’s Center for Jewish Life. The fliers had the website URL and phone number for a white supremacist group, although the university has not disclosed the name of the group. This follows another recent antisemitic incident affecting the Princeton University community. To mark Adolf Hitler’s birthday yesterday, the antisemitic group Vanguard America tweeted a message directed at Jewish Princeton students and faculty. The message was accompanied by an image of Adolf Hitler in a birthday hat. This incident pertains to our course material in that it is reliant on antisemitic rhetoric based on the legacy of the Holocaust. The memory of the Holocaust has served as fodder for antisemites in modern times despite some of those targeted by these hateful words being two or more generations removed from the generation of Jews that endured the Holocaust. While most American Jews are descended from people who immigrated to the US prior to WWII and thus may not be aware of extended family that died in the Holocaust, Holocaust based antisemitic rhetoric targeting these people still has a powerful emotional effect. The legacy of the Holocaust weighs heavy on anyone of Ashkenazi Jewish-descent because it represents the physical destruction of their heritage. Someone who is of Italian descent can still go back to Italy and reconnect with their culture in a way that is not possible for European Jews. There is no Vilna, only Vilnius. While many American Jews do go on “heritage trips” where they visit the physical spaces...

Antisemitic Flyers disseminated in Brooklyn

An April 17th, 2017 article by Forward stated that a man driving through the area of Williamsburg, on his motorcycle, threw antisemitic flyers all over the street at night. In addition to the dissemination of physical copies, an anonymous source also uploaded the image online. The flyer harshly illustrates many of the antisemitic stereotypes that we have discussed over the semester. It shows Holocaust related messages including images of swastikas, references to gas chambers, and it also has Holocaust denial phrases. The flyer has a bolded sentence that says “Question: How Long can the Jews Perpetuate the Holocaust Myth?” The flyer also illustrates old stereotypes, such as Jews having large noses and that they are a race of “born nation wreckers!.” Anti-zionism can be seen in the top left corner of the page. It depicts Israeli cynically looking at a Palestinian child, while other Palestinians are being held captive in a “Gaza Ghetto”. The flyer also calls Jews “kikes” and says that the Jews are ruining “white culture” all over the world because they are pumping their myths and lies into it. According to the article, Williamsburg is home to a large population of Orthodox European Jews. The perpetrator of the act was not identified because they were wearing a dark black helmet. However, it is clear that who ever did this put a lot of time into it because it looks like all of the images are hand drawn. This flyer is probably one of the most graphic and threatening form of antisemitic graffiti I have seen over the semester. It illustrates almost every form of antisemitism we have seen ranging from...

Antisemitic fliers on Auburn’s campus

ABC affiliate TV news station WRBL in Columbus, Georgia reported on April 12 that a new hate group at Auburn University, calling itself the White Student Union, had put up fliers around the Auburn campus. The fliers bore messages such as “Will you disobey the anti-Christian, top secret, Noahide Laws?” Another poster had images claiming to be from a secretive anti-Christian, Jewish handbook. WRBL also claimed to have found the White Student Union’s website, which read “we expect to be able to find common ground with secular Arabs who oppose Zionism and Islamism, black people who are horrified by ghetto culture, and Asian Americans who have been victimized by diversity shakedowns.” These posters are intriguing because they seem to blend Christian identity based antisemitism with their discussion of the Noahide Laws. These laws do not mention Christianity but perhaps the implication of the flier is that there is something more to them than is commonly known? The posters also blend this older form of antisemitic rhetoric with newer types of rhetoric such as the idea of a Jewish conspiracy, as we have studied in class when learned about the protocols of the Elders of Zion. As is typical of many of the incidents documented on our blog, the people who posted the fliers are seeking anonymity. While many of the incidents we document are web based, and the perpetrators rely on that medium to remain unknown these perpetrators are using a physical medium to spread hate. Seeking anonymity when spreading hate is not new, but is perhaps more common with the advent of the web. Alleged hate group spreads...